Your Mortgage Documents Might be Fake!

lynn_szymoniak-620x412Ya think, maybe? MERS alleges to have registered 71 million mortgages. There were likely another 15-20 million “non-MERS” mortgages…

Lynn Szymoniak in Salon:
BY Prepare to be outraged. Newly obtained filings from this Florida woman’s lawsuit uncover horrifying scheme (Update)

If you know about foreclosure fraud, the mass fabrication of mortgage documents in state courts by banks attempting to foreclose on homeowners, you may have one nagging question: Why did banks have to resort to this illegal scheme? Was it just cheaper to Continue reading

Where are Bear Stearns mortgage executives now?

Bear Sterns 8-5-13Bear Stearns mortgage executives have plum jobs on Wall Street…

The executives in charge of mortgage securities at the failed investment house are now at JPMorgan, Goldman and Bank of America…

Posted on The Center for Public Integrity By Lauren Kyger and Alison Fitzgerald

Before Lehman crashed, there was “The Bear.”

Bear Stearns, once the nation’s fifth-largest investment bank, had been a fixture on Wall Street since 1923 and had survived the crash of 1929 without laying off any employees. Continue reading

Majority of Supreme Court members millionaires

Ginsburg, Breyer top list of wealthiest justices

The Center for Public Integrity posted a superb article by Reity O’Brien and Chris Young.

Supreme Ct.“At least five and perhaps as many as eight of the nine members of the U.S. Supreme Court are millionaires according to recently released financial disclosures, and only two hold any consumer debt.

Assets on the forms are reported in a range making it impossible to say precisely how much each justice is worth, but suffice to say, none of them are hurting financially. Continue reading

FDIC – Hide & Sneak …and Seal

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) chairman serves at the pleasure of the President of the United States. During the financial crisis of 2008, Sheila Bair was chairman of the FDIC and was a member of a very small club: competent crisis-era financial regulators. Bair was one of the primary policymakers in Washington, DC during the 2007–2009 financial force majeure.

company-doeIt was during that time many banks and pretender lenders failed, including IndyMac Bank, FSB and Washington Mutual aka “WaMu”. Deals were contrived between banks by the FDIC as it stepped in as receiver to peel off assets making Master Purchasing Agreements between parties.

In some cases, like IndyMac and WaMu, these deals were struck before a bank could seek reorganization under bankruptcy protection. These “deals” included sealing documents that it appears pertain to sale agreements and the operations of the banks that probably should have led to a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation – rather than covering up the potential for fraud under court seal of, as it appears, the “Unassigned Records” as in the case of IndyMac. Continue reading

DUAL TRACKING VIOLATIONS DURING MODIFICATION PERSIST

Dual tracksDual tracking is when a servicer has you filling out modification paperwork and sending them your bank statements, proof of residency, tax returns, P&Ls, payroll stubs, etc. (over and over) and actually is processing your foreclosure at the same time.  Homeowners were supposed to be protected from dual tracking during modification.

But in case you were wondering if you can sleep at night while under the modification game – here are some interesting facts just released from the California Reinvestment Coalition (CRC) who distributed a survey to housing counselors in February 2013 to Report on how the banks were holding up their end of the bargain. So, if California is any indication of what the banks are doing around the rest of the country – be very wary. Continue reading

JPMorgan Chase Beaten by Beaton, Pro Se! Hallelujah!

beaten by a girlPro Se Plaintiff Deborah Beaton filed a Complaint against JPMorgan Chase wherein Defendant Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. (“NWTS”) joined in a Motion to Dismiss with Chase. In her Second Amended Complaint (SAC), Beaton alleges three causes of action:

  • (1) Violation of the Federal Debt Collection Practices Act (“FDCPA”) against NWTS,
  • (2) Incomplete Indorsement/Chain of Title, and
  • (3) violations of the Washington Deed of Trust Act (“DTA”).

USDC Honorable Richard A. Jones gave Beaton her causes of action (1) and (2) against the defendants’ Motion to Dismiss… and the beat goes on! Continue reading

Is Arrogant Bank Celebrity Jamie Dimon Too Big to Cuff?

Cufflinks AdSen. Kaufman on JPMorgan Chase: Private Lawsuit Found Evidence the Feds Didn’t – Huffington Post

“Think of it as the story of two antagonists,” writes Huffington Post’s Richard Eskow. “One of them was an honest senator who came to Washington to fight corruption.

The other is an arrogant banker who’s so sure of his untouchability that he wore “FBI” cuff-links when he made a public appearance last month.”  Eskrow continues in his brilliant exposé:

Continue reading

“Fraud Was … the F-Bomb”

PBS FRONTLINE – Watch closely – click here.

“To hear some on Wall Street tell it, no one saw the financial crisis coming. As Jamie Dimon, the chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase, explained to the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, “In mortgage underwriting, somehow we just missed … that home prices don’t go up forever.”  The program in its entirety can be viewed here.  It is definitely a must watch!Frontline 1-22-13 Continue reading

CROOKS AND LIARS – ‘Breaking The Law Should Not Be A Business Expense’

By Susie Madrak, January 18, 2013

‘Breaking The Law Should Not Be A Business Expense’

In the past, federal regulators have been known to include provisions that waived the ability of a company to write off the costs of a settlement. But since our banks are always considered Too Big To Fail, they are of course offered every consideration, and We the Continue reading

Banks Get To Name Their Own Price – Independent Foreclosure Review More Like Priceline.com

110714obamabanksters“Sneaky” comes to mind to describe the government and the banksters regarding two settlements between US banks and government regulators who alleged that the banks were guilty of widespread abuse of the foreclosure system that allowed banks to seize homes from defaulting borrowers. The banksters agreed to pay out more than $20 billion on Monday to resolve claims arising from the mortgage crisis. Continue reading