Sense on Cents: Message for Tim Geithner On the Release of Stress Test

By Larry Doyle

Dear Tim,

Geithner bookCongratulations on the release of your book. I assure you that I will read it and review it here at my blog.

Given your positions formerly as head of the New York Federal Reserve and Secretary of Treasury, you will certainly receive enormous media attention and exposure in touting your book and your take on dealing with the crisis of 2008. To wit, I see just this morning that The Wall Street Journal is running your editorial entitled The Paradox of Financial Crises.

Tim, let’s cut the bull$hit.  Continue reading

Is Jamie Dimon Still the President’s Favorite Bankster?

ROLLING STONE – FEATURE:
Chase, Once Considered “The Good Bank,” Is About to Pay Another Massive Settlement
By POSTED: July 18, 12:20 PM ET

Jamie Dimon Libor SubpeonasDuring the financial crisis, while Dr. Evil-ish Wall Street villains like Goldman and Lehman Brothers were getting all the bad press, pundits continually referred to J.P. Morgan Chase as the “good bank.” The myth of Chase as the finance sector’s one upstanding rock of rectitude reached its zenith in July of 2009 with an embarrassingly hagiographic piece in the New York Times entitled, “In Washington, One Bank Chief Still Holds Sway.” In that one, the paper breathlessly praised Jamie Dimon for emerging from “the disgrace of his industry” to become Barack Obama’s “favorite banker.”

Continue reading

FDIC – Hide & Sneak …and Seal

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) chairman serves at the pleasure of the President of the United States. During the financial crisis of 2008, Sheila Bair was chairman of the FDIC and was a member of a very small club: competent crisis-era financial regulators. Bair was one of the primary policymakers in Washington, DC during the 2007–2009 financial force majeure.

company-doeIt was during that time many banks and pretender lenders failed, including IndyMac Bank, FSB and Washington Mutual aka “WaMu”. Deals were contrived between banks by the FDIC as it stepped in as receiver to peel off assets making Master Purchasing Agreements between parties.

In some cases, like IndyMac and WaMu, these deals were struck before a bank could seek reorganization under bankruptcy protection. These “deals” included sealing documents that it appears pertain to sale agreements and the operations of the banks that probably should have led to a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation – rather than covering up the potential for fraud under court seal of, as it appears, the “Unassigned Records” as in the case of IndyMac. Continue reading