Maui County Hawaii Leads America in Regulating Corporate Power

A step closer to getting big money out of politics
Viewpoint

November 3, 2015
By ARIANNA FEINBERG (ariannafeinberg@gmail.com)

50005340-10542-001_VictorinoThank you, Maui County Council, under the leadership of Policy and Intergovernmental Affairs Committee Chairman Mike Victorino, for passing Resolution 15-124 “Requesting Maui County’s Congressional Delegation to Support an Amendment to the

United States Constitution to Permit Congress and the States to Regulate the Influence of Corporate Power on the Political System.”

This resolution shows our County Council’s support of overturning the Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission Supreme Court decision, which made it legal for corporations and other special interests to spend unlimited amounts of money to influence elections, as long as they are “uncoordinated” with candidates. Continue reading

If Corporations Are People – This Person is What the Banks Would Look Like

Not much more needs to be said… Wonder if she works for Bank of America, Wells Fargo or JPMorgan Chase?

Evil woman steals ball from little girl –  Published on Aug 14, 2012

A woman steals a discarded baseball from a young girl at Minute Maid Park.
The high five just adds insult to injury. What a giant snatch. Sounds just like the banks after a foreclosure proceeding, doesn’t it? Talk about a moral hazard…

Washington Post: Lawmakers reworked financial portfolios after talks with Fed, Treasury officials

Washington, D.C. is a town that runs on inside information – but should our elected officials be able to use that information to pad their own pockets?

By , David S. Fallis and Dan Keating, Published: June 24, 2012

“In January 2008, President George W. Bush was scrambling to bolster the American economy. The subprime mortgage industry was collapsing, and the Dow Jones industrial average had lost more than 2,000 points in less than three months. House Minority Leader John A. Boehner became the Bush administration’s point person on Capitol Hill to negotiate a $150 billion stimulus package. In the days that followed, Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson Jr. made frequent phone calls and visits to Boehner. Neither Paulson nor Boehner would publicly discuss the progress of their negotiations to shore up the nation’s financial portfolio.

Continue reading